Education in Haiti: Does the Push for More Students Lead to Less Learning?

timoun lekòl

I have written an article for Medium about how enrolling more students in school in Haiti may have lead to less learning:

… more children in low-income countries may be going to and staying in school, but few students are meeting basic competency levels in reading, math and science. In Guinea-Bissau, for instance, while the school enrollment rate was 73 percent, one survey showed that “only 27% of the children were able to add two single digits, and just 19% were able to read and comprehend a simple word.”

The situation in Haiti is likely to be similar, but moreover, there is mounting anecdotal evidence that the increase in enrollment and school completion has been done at the expense of the quality of education provided.

You can read the whole thing here.

Photo by Bernard Chérélus

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7 Responses to Education in Haiti: Does the Push for More Students Lead to Less Learning?

  1. Carline says:

    Could you please elaborate on this statement: “The situation in Haiti is likely to be similar, but moreover, there is mounting anecdotal evidence that the increase in enrollment and school completion has been done at the expense of the quality of education provided”.
    thanks

  2. kaytikal says:

    What I’m trying to say here can be expressed like this: 1-The quality of education in Haiti is likely to be low just like in Guinea-Bissau. 2- This quality has decreased over the last years. 3-There is some evidence that the decline in quality is the result of the increase in quantity (enrollment) because teachers are increasingly less qualified.

  3. tifi says:

    Interesting article. Maybe you can write an additional article with suggestions on how this (expected learning issue) can be prevented.

    • kaytikal says:

      As I am not an education expert, I will not make very specific recommendations here, but one thing could be to start by spending more money on quality in a few schools for low income families (one could call them “centers of excellence”) and gradually extend the model to the whole education system. For instance, in these “centers of excellence” the money could be spent on hiring more qualified teachers that would be paid more than usual.
      But again, I am no education expert. Nevertheless, I think it’s worth it to see how greater enrollment may lead to lower quality and have people starting to think about how to address this challenge.

  4. Cecilia Russ says:

    I think, from what I have heard–that education (especially “private education”) is in trouble for the last few years. Teachers aren’t paid regularly and there are few good eduational supplies. Further, the worsening economy and meant parents can’t afford to pay for education.
    A “parent supported” education won’t work if the economy is terrible. I don’t think the teachers should be blamed. There are also large class sizes. Many teachers could benefit from teacher training or more experienced “mentors”. I think the problem is basic: Lack of money. There is probably a push for the gov. to control the schools. Fortunately, they don’t have the power-yet.
    If that happens you will have education U.S. “style”–with some children getting “electronic media” education, others going to “fly by night Charter Schools”, schools closing–ect.
    The U.S. has about 60% drop out rate–so hasn’t got anything to offer Haiti in criticising the
    “the quality” of Haitian teachers. I attended a private Catholic school. My mother worked very
    hard to be able to pay tuition, uniforms and other things that were life saving, for me. When I left private school to attend public school–I learned almost nothing. Governments don’t run schools very well. When parents pay for their children’s education–and chose the school–they have more interest

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